f

Theme Layout

Boxed or Wide or Framed

Theme Translation

Display Featured Slider

Featured Slider Styles

Display Grid Slider

Grid Slider Styles

Display Trending Posts

Display Author Bio

No

Display Instagram Footer

Easy Old Fashioned Gingerbread

Easy Old Fashioned Gingerbread


  

Easy Old Fashioned Gingerbread

 Easy Old Fashioned Gingerbread. I have shared a  lot of gingerbread recipes on here over the years.  Soft gingerbread cake is something that I love and I can honestly say that I have never met a gingerbread that I did not like or fall in love with.

This recipe I am sharing today is one of my favourites thus far. It is easy and quick to make and incredibly moist and delicious.


I adapted the recipe from one I found in this Betty Crocker cookerybook entitled, Lost Recipes. Beloved Vintage recipes for Today's Kitchen.  What can I say?  I love Vintage anything.

Since my return to Canada, while I am waiting to move into my own home, I have been busy creating things for my new home.  I've been embroidering tea towels, crocheting blankets, dishcloths, etc.  I think it is called nesting.


I really love things with an old fashioned vintage flair, so it is really bringing me a lot of joy to do these things. Now I will have nobody to really please most of the time but myself. I won't have to worry about a man damaging my work, by using an embroidered tea towell to mop up oil etc.

That's a plus.  And I can cook as much pasta, lemon, or chocolate as I like.  It will be a whole new adventure for me. But back to the cake.


I have to say that I really, really LOVE this cookery book. Every recipe which I have cooked/baked from it has turned out beautifully and been most delicious.  All classics in their own right and very tasty.

As they say, don't fix what isn't broken, and none of the recipes in here are broken.  These are truly classic, family style recipes. The type you would be proud to hand down to future generations.


Just like vintage tea towels and needleworks. I believe this recipe was first published in the Bey Crocker Picture Cook Book back in 1961.  Another classic cookbook I wouldn't be without. Like my good old Fanny Farmer cookbook, these recipes just never go out of fashion.

Early North American Settlers were somewhat limited in what they could use to sweeten their baked goods with.  Sugar was quite expensive back then and I know that here in Nova Scotia, many things were sweetened with either Maple Syrup or molasses, both of which were much cheaper in comparison.


Molasses is a by-product of the sugar cane industry and was used to help distill beer and rum. It was a cheap alternative to sugar and you will see a great many recipes from post 20th century using it in one way or another.

Where I come from, the maritime provinces, it is a very common thing and you will find a jug of it in most kitchens and perhaps even a pouring jug of it on the table at every meal.  Molasses, thick bread and butter has kept many a child (or man) satisfied and helped to stave away the hunger pains.


This is a particularly easy gingerbread recipe.  Everything just gets measured into a bowl and beaten together.  You do need a small amount of sugar. Its just granulated sugar.  

Granulated sugar is much finer here in Canada than it is in the UK. In the UK, I recommend using caster sugar. Molasses might also be more difficult to come by in the UK. You can replicate its mild flavour by mixing together equal parts of light and dark treacle.


This recipe goes together quickly and easily, using the one-bowl method. Most other recipes involve creaming things and then adding boiling water at the end.  This one has no faffing about whatsoever with any of that.

Simply measure everything out and beat it together.  The resulting batter was a bit thicker than my usual gingerbread recipe, but I have to tell you , it smelled just as amazing when it was baking.  AMAZING!


This is a basic no-frills recipe. No bells and whistles. Simple ingredients, simply put together in a most delicious way. I would not add anything else.

It is perfect just as it is.  PER   FECT!  Simple as that.


It has a lovey spicy flavour and a certain amount of smoky robustness from the molasses. If you are not overly fond of the flavour of molasses, you can use half molasses and half maple syrup. 

Do note however, that this will give you an extra mild flavour. You may want to add some ground cloves or allspice or both in that case. Not a lot, just a pinch of each.

Easy Old Fashioned Gingerbread

It was suggested that you serve this with some sweetened whipped cream.  In the UK we never sweetened our whipped cream.  At first I thought this was rather strange.  I had always only ever had whipped cream sweetened with sugar.  I got used to having it unsweetened however, and I have to say I much prefer it that way now.

There are instructions included on how to do sweetened whipped cream however.  Today we used spray whipped cream. (Not my choice) I don't think that spray whipped cream has the holding and staying power of real whipped cream.  But you use whatever you have that you like.


Something I have done in the past and that we have always enjoyed is to fold some lemon curd into softly whipped heavy cream. Oh my but this is really lush.  Lemon and ginger are perfect partners.

You can also make a spiced lemon sauce which is beautiful served warm with it. Just ask and I will share my recipe for this. Its lovely.

Easy Old Fashioned Gingerbread

There is no doubt about it, this is quite simply a lovely gingerbread.  As my sister said, it was not cloying or claggy. It didn't stick to the roof of your mouth and had a beautiful light texture.

I would and will make this again. JUST AS IT, with no adaptations.  Whats the point in messing with perfection!



Old Fashioned Gingerbread

Old Fashioned Gingerbread
Yield: 9
Author: Marie Rayner
prep time: 10 Mincook time: 55 Mintotal time: 1 H & 4 M
Gingerbread. The comfort food cake. Lovely served warm with some whipped cream or lemon sauce.

Ingredients

  • 2 1/3 cups (326g) plain all purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda (bicarbonate of soda)
  • 1 tsp ground dried ginger
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup (120g) butter, softened
  • 1/3 cup (65g) granulated sugar
  • 1 cup (240ml) mild molasses
  • 3/4 cup (180ml) hot water
  • 1 large free range egg
For sweetened whipped cream:
  • 1/2 cup (120ml) heavy whipping cream
  • 1 TBS icing sugar, sifted
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325*F/165*C/ gas mark 3.  Butter an 9-inch square baking dish and line with baking parchment.
  2. Place all of the gingerbread ingredients into a bowl. Beat with an electric hand mixer for 30 seconds on low speed, scraping the bowl constantly.  Increase speed to medium and beat for a further 3  minutes, scraping the bowl occasionally. You will have a light fluffy batter.  Scrap the batter into the prepared pan, leveling it off.
  3. Bake in the preheated oven for 50 to 55 minutes, until well risen and a toothpick inserted in the centre comes out clean.
  4. Set on a wire rack to cool as desired.  Serve warm or at room temperature.
  5. To make the sweetened whipped cream, beat all of the whipped cream ingredients together in a well chilled bowl using chilled beaters and an electric hand mixer on low speed just until the mixture begins to thicken.
  6. Increase the speed to high gradually and beat just until soft peaks form. (See note) Serve with the warm gingerbread.

notes:

Take care not to overbeat your cream or it will curdle. If this happens however, you can easily fix it by folding in a bit more cream until you get the consistency you desire.


For a lemon cream, omit the vanilla and fold in a couple TBS of lemon curd.

Did you make this recipe?
Tag @marierayner5530 on instagram and hashtag it #EnglishKitchen
Created using The Recipes Generator
Easy Old Fashioned Gingerbread

This content (written and photography) is the sole property of The English Kitchen. Any reposting or misuse is not permitted. If you are reading this elsewhere, please know that it is stolen content and you may report it to me at mariealicejoan at aol dot com. 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Read more »
Marie Rayner
6 Comments
Blueberry Custard Pie

Blueberry Custard Pie


I am excited to share a fabulously tasty recipe for a good old fashioned blueberry custard pie with you today.  This is the kind of pie that women have been baking in their kitchens for many, many years now.  I first shared this recipe with you back in the summer of 2011.

Some things are just so delicious, they bear repeating and reminding of. Especially when you are talking about a fabulously tasty twist on the good old classic blueberry pie.

Blueberry Custard Pie 
Classic blueberry pie has long been a favorite of mine, especially when made with fresh summer berries. This delicious twist is like that old favorite amped up, with a lush and creamy custard filling, topped with a wonderfully moreish sweet, crisp and buttery streusel topping.

It just does not get much better than this!  Incredibly easy to put together, this deliciously different blueberry pie makes a fabulous dessert for any occasion! 

Blueberry Custard Pie 
Once upon a time this would have been a pie you could only make during the summer months when fresh berries were widely available and abundant. Thankfully these days fresh blueberries are available all year round.  Lucky us! 

If you do need to use frozen berries, don't thaw them out first. Just use them frozen from the package. Thawing them out first will give you a soggy result.  For the best result however, I always use fresh berries if I can.

Blueberry Custard Pie 
This pie could not be any easier to make.  Berries are first layered onto the bottom of an unbaked 9-inch pie crust. I highly recommend my butter/lard pastry.  It is phenomenal. 

You can find that recipe here on my Apple Dumpling recipe. (Another phenomenal recipe by the way.) It does make 2 9-inch crusts, but don't worry about the extra one. You can simply shape it into a disc, wrap tightly and freeze it for another time. Simple

Blueberry Custard Pie 
It makes for one of the flakiest most delicious crusts. It is tender and flaky and melts in the mouth. I cannot recommend it any more highly!  It is my crust of choice, always.

You begin by layering berries in the bottom of the crust.  You can use other berries if you wish such as raspberries, blackberries, black currants, etc. or even a berry mix. We love it best with blueberries however.

Blueberry Custard Pie 
Once you have the berries in the crust a simple flour and sugar mixture is sprinkled over top. You can mix it through a bit. I use granulated sugar here in North America, but if you are in the UK, I recommend caster sugar as it is much finer and will melt easier in the cooking process.

A milky custard mixture will be poured over top of the berry/sugar/flour mixture.  This is created by beating together eggs, vanilla and evaporated milk. 

evaporated milk 

Evaporated milk is a shelf-stable type of cow's milk sold in cans. It has had 60% of its water content removed and is interchangeable with cream in most baked goods.  Do NOT confuse it with sweetened condensed milk.

Sweetened condensed milk is a completely different thing and has had a lot of sugar added to it, which makes it thick and syrupy.  Evaporated milk has had no sugar added to it. It is simply milk which has been condensed down. 

It is dense, creamy and concentrated but not sweet. You can also whip it if you chill it until it is really cold and contains ice crystals. I always keep several cans of it in my larder. It comes in handy for all sorts.


Blueberry Custard Pie 
This quick and easy custard is poured over the base of berries and then a simple sugar streusel is sprinkled over top.  I always make sure my streusel topping is made before I begin making the pie. That way I can sprinkle it over top as soon as I pour on the custard and then bang my pie into the oven lickety split! 

Sugar, butter and vanilla with a bit of flour are rubbed together to make coarse crumbs.  This bakes on top and gives a lovely crunchy topping that goes incredibly well with that creamy custard base.

Blueberry Custard Pie 
I have seen other recipes similar to this where the flour mixture is beaten into the milk and eggs.  I have also seen it made using sour cream. I have never done or used either of those methods or ingredients,  preferring instead to use this simple old fashioned recipe.

This blueberry custard pie recipe has been pleasing my family for many, many years now. Simply put it is my favorite of all the blueberry pies that I make.

Blueberry Custard Pie 

 
It will need to bake for about an hour for everything to set up. If you think the crust edges are browning too quickly, you can cover them with a bit of aluminum foil.  This works very well for that purpose. 

The hardest part of this easy pie is waiting until it is cold enough to cut and to eat.  I leave it on a wire rack to cool to room temperature and then you can either cut it then, or you can refrigerate it overnight. It will cut like a dream then. 

In any case you will need to leave it sit for about 2 hours before cutting and serving.  I usually make this the day before I want to serve it.

 
Blueberry Custard Pie 

You can of course serve this delicious pie with scoops of vanilla ice cream of dollops of softly whipped cream spooned over top. We like it just as it is without any adornment.

It is lush, delicious, incredibly moreish and destined to become a favorite in your home too I dare say. If you bake only one pie this weekend, let it be this one. You can thank me afterwards.

Yield: Makes one 9-inch pie
Author: Marie Rayner
Blueberry Custard Pie

Blueberry Custard Pie

A delicious berry pie layered with blueberries, custard and a vanilla streusel on top!
prep time: 10 Mincook time: 1 Hourinactive time: 2 Hourtotal time: 3 H & 10 M

Ingredients

You will need:
  • one 9-inch unbaked pie crust
For the filling:
  • 1/4 cup (35g)  plain flour
  • 1 1/2  (295g) cups sugar
  • 3 cups (450g) of blueberries
  • 2 large free range eggs, beaten lightly
  • 3/4 cup  (180ml) evaporated milk (NOT sweetened condensed)
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
For the streusel topping:
  • 1/3 cup (47g) of plain all purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup (97g)  sugar
  • 1/4 cup (60g) cold butter, cut into bits
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180*C/350*F/ gas mark 4. Line a 9 inch glass pie dish with your pastry, trimming and crimping the edges to please.
  2. Put the berries into the crust.
  3. Whisk together the flour and sugar for the filling to mix. Sprinkle this evenly over the berries, stirring them up a bit to mix.
  4. Beat together the eggs, evaporated milk and vanilla. Pour this evenly over top of the berries and flour mixture.
  5. Rub the streusel ingredients together until they resemble coarse crumbs. Sprinkle evenly over the berry filling.
  6. Bake for about 1 hour in the heated oven until the pie is golden brown and set and the crust is nicely crisped.
  7. Allow to cool at least two hours before serving. Store any leftovers in the refrigerator.
Did you make this recipe?
Tag @marierayner5530 on instagram and hashtag it #EnglishKitchen
Created using The Recipes Generator
Blueberry Custard Pie

This content (written and photography) is the sole property of The English Kitchen. Any reposting or misuse is not permitted. If you are reading this elsewhere, please know that it is stolen content and you may report it to me at mariealicejoan at aol dot com. 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Read more »
Marie Rayner
5 Comments
Traditional Irish Soda Bread

Traditional Irish Soda Bread


Traditional Irish Soda Bread 
Traditional Irish Soda Bread. There is no better way to celebrate Saint Patrick's Day than to treat your family to some of the traditional dishes of Ireland!  You can't get more Irish than Soda Bread, and this traditional Irish Soda Bread recipe is one of the best. 

As they say, "The proof is in the eating," and this one eats very well, if I don't say so myself!

Traditional Irish Soda Bread 
The history of this Irish soda bread is interesting to say the least! I was completely blown away by what I discovered! Whilst soda bread is most often attributed to the Irish, it was actually first created by the North American Indigenous peoples. 

They were the first people known to have used pearl ash to leaven their breads without yeast. Pearl ash is the residue, or a natural form of soda formed from the ashes of wood fires.

The Irish later discovered the recipe and replicated the Native North American process. It may seem like an ancient Irish recipe, but it really only came to Ireland in the 1830's when bicarbonate of soda/baking soda was first introduced to the country. 

You can read more about that here.  Trust me, I don't make this stuff up!


Traditional Irish Soda Bread 
Whatever Irish Soda Bread history is, one thing for certain remains.  It is one dang good non-yeasted bread!  Easy to make and bake and most delicious! 

This is a simple classic bread in many Irish households.  Perfect for mopping up gravies and stews and for serving alongside of hearty broths and soups!  

It is also pretty wonderful served warm, buttered, and spread with jam or honey, meant to be washed down with copious cups of hot tea!

Traditional Irish Soda Bread 
I am not surprised that this became an Irish family staple.  As well as being a symbol of celebration, it was also a very humble necessity in poor Irish homes. This very affordable necessity was the perfect solution to many of the problems facing the Irish in the early 1800's.

Due to widespread famine, bread, a household staple, needed to be made out of the cheapest, most affordable and basic ingredients available at the time. Needing only four basic ingredients, flour, soda, salt and sour milk, it was the perfect answer to their problems.

Traditional Irish Soda Bread 
We tend to use buttermilk for the most part these days when making this bread.  This always results in a lovely moist and tender bread with a beautiful crumb and crust. The combination of buttermilk and soda creates a chemical reaction which causes the bread to rise beautifully.  

This reaction starts almost immediately, which is why it is important, perhaps even vital, that you get your bread into the hot oven within five minutes or so of mixing the bread together. This insures the perfect rise.  

You also want to make sure that (as with any quick bread such as this) you use a very light hand when kneading it. Kneading it no more than 10 times insures the perfect result you are looking for. Over-kneading toughens quick breads like this one. Be gentle with it.

Traditional Irish Soda Bread 
This lovely recipe that I am sharing today is my absolute favorite version of soda bread. It uses two kinds of flour, plain and whole wheat.  It also boasts the wholesome addition of rolled oats, both in the dough and sprinkled over top.

I don't know about you, but I absolutely love anything which has oats added to it. They impart a lovely nutty texture and the TBS of oats that is sprinkled on top adds a certain rustic beauty. Then again, I am a bit of a romanticist. I like pretty things. 

The combination of both white and whole wheat flours give this delicious bread a tender crumb with a lovely wholesome and hearty flavor!

It uses buttermilk, but don't worry if you don't have any in the house. I have given you instructions on how to make your own buttermilk substitute in the notes of the recipe.  All you will need is some lemon juice or vinegar and regular full fat milk.

I  highly recommend that you use whole, full fat milk for this. You will not get the same result if using lower fat milk.

Traditional Irish Soda Bread 
The shape of an Irish Soda Bread is something which is very regional as well as being steeped in tradition. In the North of Ireland, they tend to cut the dough into four pieces, shaping each into a wedge. They also like to bake it on top of the stove/fire on a flat girdle/griddle pan.

In the South, you will find it shaped and baked most commonly in a round loaf, which is the classic shape we are most used to seeing.  They also cut a cross into the top of the bread, which is said to ward off evil spirits. It helps to let the fairies out of the bread, thereby protecting the household, and keeping the family safe.

Traditional Irish Soda Bread 
This method of cooking Irish Soda Bread is very quick.  Traditionally it would have been baked every two or three days, meant to be eaten with their main meals.  Historically these would have been very humble and meagre meals, so it also helped to stretch the food offered out a bit and to fill hungry empty tummy's in a most delicious way!

You just have to love all of these old customs and traditions. They are a part and parcel of what makes food interesting and so delicious to eat. I absolutely adore eating traditional foods with a fascinating history, don't you?

One thing is for certain, this is a fabulous way to celebrate the up-coming Saint Patrick's Day holiday. You don't have to be Irish to enjoy this wonderful quick, non-yeasted and wholesome bread!

Traditional Irish Soda Bread 
Whether you bake it to serve with a hot stew or soup, with jam and a hot cuppa, or even to be enjoyed cold with a platter of cheese and butter, one thing is for certain. You WILL enjoy it. 

Plain or toasted.  Warm or cold. This is a bread that satisfies and puts a smile on the face. Why not bake your family up some tasty Irish tradition this March 17th!

 Traditional Irish Soda Bread

Traditional Irish Soda Bread

Yield: makes one round loaf, or 8 servings
Author: Marie Rayner
prep time: 10 Mincook time: 30 Mintotal time: 40 Min
This quick and simple bread is the perfect bread to serve on Saint Patrick's Day or any day really. Its delicious! Especially with butter and jam. I also love it toasted.

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cups (245g) whole wheat flour
  • 1 3/4 cups (245g) plain all purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp fine sea salt
  • 1 heaped tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
  • 2 TBS cold butter
  • 10 TBS (50g) rolled oats
  • 1 2/3 cups (400ml) buttermilk (see note below)
  • 1 TBS old fashioned oats

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400*F/200*C/gas  mark 6.  Have ready a baking sheet, lined with baking parchment.
  2. Measure both flours into a large bowl. Stir in the salt and soda. Drop in the butter. Rub the butter into the mixture with your fingertips.
  3. Remove and reserve 1 TBS oats, then stir the remainder into the flour mixture.
  4. Pour in the buttermilk and quickly mix together using a round bladed knife. You should have a slightly sticky dough. If you think it is too dry, you can add a bit more buttermilk.
  5. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and shape into an 8 inch round. Place onto the prepared baking sheet. Cut a deep cross into the top with a sharp knife. Sprinkle with the reserved TBS of oats.
  6. Bake in the preheated oven for 30 minutes, until golden brown When cooked it should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom. Place on a wire rack to cool for a bit before cutting into slices to sere.

notes:

How to make your own buttermilk: Place 2 TBS of vinegar or lemon juice into a glass measure. Add whole milk to make up 1 cup/240ml. Leave to stand for five minutes before using.

Did you make this recipe?
Tag @marierayner5530 on instagram and hashtag it #EnglishKitchen
Created using The Recipes Generator
Traditional Irish Soda Bread

This content (written and photography) is the sole property of The English Kitchen. Any reposting or misuse is not permitted. If you are reading this elsewhere, please know that it is stolen content and you may report it to me at mariealicejoan at aol dot com. 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Read more »
Marie Rayner
6 Comments
How to Cook Chicken in the Microwave

How to Cook Chicken in the Microwave


Chicken and Dumpling Casserole

No doubt about it, we eat a lot of chicken in this house. We love chicken and in all honesty, you cannot find a meat protein that is more adaptable than chicken.  It is one of those meats that quite easily goes with a multitude of flavors and cuisines. 

More often than not I will cook chicken pieces.  Either the breasts, or quarters, or thighs.  We are also very fond of chicken casseroles.  For those I often need either leftover roast chicken to use, or I will specifically cook and shred chicken breasts to use.  

I often buy whole packs of chicken breasts when they are on offer at the shops and poach or cook them, packing the meat into two cup containers, and freezing them. That way I always have a quantity of cooked chicken ready to use in a tasty dish at any given time.

One of the easiest ways to cook this chicken is in the microwave. If you know how to cook chicken in the microwave you will never be short of cooked shredded chicken. It is very simple to do and very quick. The chicken always comes out moist and delicious. Perfect for shredding or dicing. 
 
How to Cook Chicken in the Microwave 

When I worked at the Manor, I was always poaching chicken to be used in recipes, sandwiches, etc. My boss used to get me to poach them in a mixture of vermouth, stock and peppercorns.  And yes, in the microwave.  This method is very similar, but does not use vermouth.

You can poach chicken in the crock pot, instant pot, or in a saucepan on top of the stove as well. It does always yield moist and easy to shred chicken. 

Cooking it in the microwave, however, is simply the best and quickest way of doing it. 

I usually cook four breasts at a time.  Why breasts?  Because they lend themselves beautifully to this manner of cooking and they have the mildest flavor which makes them perfect for dishes and recipes in which you need to use cooked chicken.

You will need a microwave safe dish which is large enough to hold your chicken breasts in one layer, with a bit of space available around each of them.  I simply season my chicken all over with either just salt and pepper, or  any other seasoning pertinent to the type of casserole you are wanting to make.

For instance if you are looking for a Mexican style casserole, then I would use Tex Mex seasoning, etc. If you are wanting to use them in a regular casserole just use ordinary sea salt and pepper, or seasoning salt.

Place them into the casserole dish with the widest side facing the outside of the dish.  Microwaves cook from the outer edges in towards the center of the dish.  The outer edges will begin to cook first.  That is why it is important to put the wide edge at the outside so that the narrower ends don't become over-cooked and dry. (See above photograph for perfect placement.)

You will need to add water, stock, or some other liquid in a quantity that will come to a level approximately 1/3 of the way up the breast.

How to Cook Chicken in the Microwave 

Once you have done that cover the dish with a single sheet of waxed paper or parchment paper.  You can also use a sheet of plastic wrap.

The goal here is to create a steam bath.  As the liquid in the casserole begins to boil, it creates steam which in turn helps to cook and poach the chicken perfectly, always with a tender and moist finish. 

Cook the in the microwave on high for four to five minutes per piece of chicken.

How to Cook Chicken in the Microwave 

The exact timings will depend on the size and thickness of your chicken and how many breasts you have in the casserole dish.  Do note however, if you are using plastic cling film/wrap you should leave a corner of the casserole dish open to vent it.

How to Cook Chicken in the Microwave

They come out perfectly cooked and ready for other uses. I like to check the internal temperature just to make sure they are cooked through properly with a meat thermometer. It is best to check this by using a meat thermometer.  The proper temperature should be 165*F/74*C. 


Microwave Poached Chicken Breasts

Microwave Poached Chicken Breasts

Yield: variable
Author: Marie Rayner
Two tasty ways to poach chicken breasts in the microwave. Both work very well, giving you delicious and succulent cooked chicken ready to use in a multitude of chicken casseroles, etc.

Ingredients

Method One:
  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 2 T chicken broth, white wine, citrus juice or water
Method Two:
  • 60ml orange juice (1/4 cup)
  • 2 TBS butter
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts

Instructions

  1. For method one: Trim the chicken breasts; place in a microwave-safe 9-inch glass pie plate, and arrange them with the thicker portions toward the outside of the dish. Drizzle with the chicken broth. Cover with microwave-safe plastic wrap. Make a vent for the dish by turning a small section of plastic wrap back on itself, leaving a slender vent on one side of the plate. Microwave on high for 6 to 8 minutes, turning after 4 minutes. Let stand covered until ready to serve.
  2. For method two: In an 8 x 8 inch microwave safe baking dish, mix orange juice, butter, pepper and salt. Microwave on high for 2 minutes. Place chicken in baking dish. Spoon liquid mixture over chicken and cover dish with wax paper. Microwave on high for 12 minutes. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.
  3. You can of course use other seasonings and liquids. The secret is to have the tight cover so the juices do not evaporate in cooking.
Did you make this recipe?
Tag @marierayner5530 on instagram and hashtag it #marierayner5530
Created using The Recipes Generator

Now that you have some delicious cooked chicken you may be wondering how you can use it. You can of course shred or dice it, pack it into airtight containers and freeze it. In any case here are some of my favorite suggestions on how to use some of it. All are delicious! 

Chicken and Dumpling Casserole 


A fabulously tasty casserole that is quick and easy to make. Shredded chicken gets drizzled with a dumpling batter, with a liquid gravy poured over top. Like magic it makes a saucy chicken in gravy topped with dumplings. Serve with your favourite sides for midweek meal. Sized for two people, but you can easily double this recipe. (Click recipe title to go to the recipe) 

Chicken Enchilada Bake 

This cheesy layered chicken enchilada casserole makes for a really quick, easy and delicious dinner time entrĂ©e. All you need is chicken, beans, sauce, cheese, and tortillas. Serve it with your favorite enchilada toppings for a real family pleaser! Click on recipe title to take you to the recipe. 

Hunter's Chicken and Chips


There are basically only four steps to follow for this fabulously tasty casserole.  Making it is as simple as throwing some frozen oven chips into the oven to bake and then topping with shredded cooked chicken. You dress the shredded cooked chicken with barbeque sauce. Then you layer them in a casserole dish with some cheese and salad dressing and then top with some bacon bits and crispy onions. Click title to go to this easy and delicious recipe. 

Crunchy Chicken Casserole 


Simple and satisfyingly delicious. Creamy and rich with lots of crunch. All you need on the side is a cooked vegetable and perhaps some crusty bread.  Click on recipe title to go to the recipe. 

CHICKEN AND MUSHROOM CASSEROLE WITH CRUSTY DUMPLINGS 


Chunks of tender chicken, salty bacon, onions and browned mushrooms in a tasty sauce, topped with flavorful chive suet dumplings and baked in the oven until the casserole is all hot and bubbly and the dumplings are crusty and lightly browned.  Click on title to go to recipe. 

Hot Chicken Salad 

This was a very popular luncheon dish for Ladies Who Lunch back in the 1960's and 70's.  Simple and yet very delicious! Rich and creamy with plenty of crunch and flavour. Click on title to get this fabulously tasty recipe.

Chicken Crumble Pot Pie 

Chicken . . .  Check!  Pot Pie . . .  Check!!  Crumble . . .  Check !!!  The three together  . . .  well that just spells Winner Winner Chicken Dinner to me! Click on the recipe title to go to this fabulous family friendly recipe!   

Buffalo Chicken Quesadillas 


If you like quesadillas and buffalo wings, you will  love, LOVE these simple Buffalo Chicken Quesadillas!  All the flavour of the wings, with less faffing about. I like to serve the with a tasty blue cheese dressing for dipping and some vegetable sticks. See recipe title for link to recipe. 

Chicken Divan Casserole 

It's like having a bit plate of broccoli cheese and chicken all in one go . . . of course the crisp cracker and cheese topping is awfully scrummy as well. It  is an economical, delicious casserole that is so simple to make! By using low fat ingredients you can also keep it fairly healthy. Click title to go to recipe link. 

Amish Chicken Casserole 


I saved the best for last. Amish Chicken Casserole is one of my absolute all time favorite chicken casseroles.   Not only is is a great way to use up stale bread, but you can also use up leftover cooked chicken or even turkey, or you can cook chicken specifically just to use in it.   This is delicious every which way but loose!  Click recipe title to go to link. I like to serve it with some gravy, boiled new potatoes and vegetables on the side. 

Amish Chicken Casserole 

This content (written and photography) is the sole property of The English Kitchen. Any reposting or misuse is not permitted. If you are reading this elsewhere, please know that it is stolen content and you may report it to me at mariealicejoan at aol dot com. 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin











Read more »
Marie Rayner
8 Comments

Follow @georgialoustudios