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Nan's Sugar Scones


Nan's Sugar Scones

Nan's Sugar Scones.  I think this has to be one of the best, if not the best scone recipe! I adapted this delicious recipe from one in the April issue of Delicious magazine.  

From the moment I saw it, I knew it was something I wanted to bake.   A fairly ordinary buttermilk English scones recipe which have lemon soaked sugar cubes pushed into their centers!

Nan's Sugar Scones

The scone dough is fairly simple.  It was quite damp, so if you want scones that look more like baking powder biscuits, don't add all of the liquid.  I found it very tacky. 

 I did not want to add too much extra flour to them, so I just patted them out on a well floured surface and used a well floured cutter to cut them out.

 Nan's Sugar Scones

Because the dough was kind of tacky they spread a bit . . .  the ones in the magazine were straight up and down.  

I actually  liked them spread out a bit, and soft sided . . .

Nan's Sugar Scones

The lemon soaked sugar cubes melt and end up tasting sort of like lemon curd.  It's like magic really!

I love magic in cooking, don't you?

Nan's Sugar Scones

In the magazine they recommended serving them with cream and jam, but I can tell you, they were positively delicious all on their own.  

Even the day after.   In fact we found them quite, quite moreish!

 Nan's Sugar Scones

*Nan's Sugar Scones*
Makes 15 medium scones

These are delicious!  For soft sided scones, place them close together on the pan, for crisp crusted ones place them on the baking sheet with some space in between.  Adapted from a recipe found in Delicious magazine. 

400g self raising flour, plus extra for dusting (3 1/2 cups)
50g caster sugar (1/4 cup)
1 tsp salt
60g cold unsalted butter, cut into bits (1/4 cup)
310ml buttermilk (1 1/3 cup)
the finely grated zest of 2 unwaxed lemons
the juice of one lemon
15 sugar cubes
buttermilk to glaze 

Nan's Sugar Scones

Preheat the oven to 230*C/425*F/ gas mark 7.  Line a baking sheet with baking paper.  Set aside.


Measure the flour into a bowl.  Whisk in the sugar and salt.  Drop in the butter.  Rub the butter in with your fingertip until the mixture resembles fine bread crumbs.  Stir in the lemon zest.  Add most of the buttermilk, stirring it in with a round bladed knife.  Only add the remaining buttermilk to give you a soft dough.  Turn out onto a floured surface and knead gently 2 or 3 times.  Pat or roll out to 1 inch thickness. 

 Nan's Sugar Scones


Cut into 2 1/2 inch rounds using a sharp round cutter and using a sharp tapping up and down motion.  Do not twist the cutter and flour the cutter in between cuts.  Place the scones onto the baking sheet as desired.  Gather the trimmings and re-pat and cut until you have used up all the dough, and placing them on the baking sheet.

Nan's Sugar Scones


Place the lemon juice into a bowl.  Working with one sugar cube at a time dip them into the lemon juice, turning to coat,  and then push them down into the centre of each scone.  Once you have finished this, brush the scones with a bit more buttermilk.

Nan's Sugar Scones


Bake for 12 to 15 minutes until they are risen and golden brown.   Serve warm or cold, on the day, with some cream and jam.   Delicious!

Nan's Sugar Scones

Hope you will give them a go and let me know what you think!

Bon Appetit! 

Nan's Sugar Scones 

This content (written and photography) is the sole property of The English Kitchen. Any reposting or misuse is not permitted. If you are reading this elsewhere, please know that it is stolen content and you may report it to me at mariealicejoan at aol dot com. 

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British Bangers with Buttermilk and Chive Mash




Todd just loves his Banger's and Mash. If I want to make him happy, that's all I have to cook up. He could very easily  eat them more than once every week!

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Garlic Lamb Cutlets with a Mint & Sun Blush Tomato Sauce




If you are looking for a delicious way to cook some lovely spring lamb cutlets look no further!  I adapted this delicious recipe from  a cookery book of mine entitled,  "Secrets from a Country Kitchen" by Lucy Young. The original recipe called for studding two 7 chop rack of lamb with garlic and roasting them for about 25 minutes in a hot oven. I didn't have a rack of lamb, but the recipe looked so tasty that I really wanted to try it, and so I did what any good cook does . . .  I switched it out for what I did have which was  . . . 

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That's one Sharp Cookie Mrs Crimbles!



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Mrs Crimble’s – Britain’s best-loved gluten free bakery brand – has created some deliciously zesty NEW Lemon Cookies. The cookies are both wheat and gluten free and are made with golden oats, tangy lemon curd and studded with lemon zest.

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They come individually wrapped, with  two cookies per pack.   These Lemon Cookies are sure to jazz up a cup of tea or coffee, and make the perfect treat whether you are at home or on the move.

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They are nice and crumbly with a moreish lemon bite!  We really enjoyed them. Its nice to know that coeliacs don't have to do without tasty treats!  We have a Missionary serving in our Ward area at the moment who is a Coeliac and I was able to pick up some of these and a few more goodies to have in the house for when he comes over.  As you know I do love to spoil the Missionaries!

  Thanks Mrs Crimbles!

Mrs Crimble’s was founded over 30 years ago and today their products can be found in all good independent farm shops, health stores, delicatessens and supermarkets such as Sainsbury’s, Asda, Waitrose, Morrisons, Co-op, and Tesco. Mrs Crimble’s can also be found in the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. ·

Mrs Crimble’s entire range can be viewed at www.mrscrimbles.com.

 · One of Mrs Crimble’s best-selling Choc Macaroons is eaten every second worldwide!
· The company is the Official Free From Sponsor of the England Netball team who recently won the Bronze medal in the 2015 Netball World Cup in Sydney, Australia.
 · Mrs Crimble’s was recently ranked 7th best-selling cake brand (The Grocer Top 20 Cakes, 17 Dec 2015) · Mrs Crimble’s have launched a fresh, new sub-brand – Gluten Free… and Good For Me, combining convenient meal solutions with positive health benefits.
· Mrs Crimble’s are also proud sponsors of the UK’s largest breast cancer charity, Breast Cancer Now

These tasty new Lemon Cookies sell for 69p a pack.  To check out more about them and Mrs Crimbles other products do take a look at the Mrs Crimbles Website.  (I always have their macaroons in the house.   We are quite addicted to them! They are fabulous!)

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Persian Cucumber Salad


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This is a fresh and simple salad that you will find yourself using a lot over these next few months.  I know it feels a bit like Winter here this week, but it won't be too long before temperatures will be soaring and you will be popping out the grills and BBQ season will be upon us!

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Mushroom Sauced Turkey Tenderloins


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I know it might not seem  like it sometimes, but I do try to eat healthy.  All the cake recipes etc. you see on here, I didn't bake them all at the same time.  I try to only bake two things a week and those I bake at the weekend.  The rest of the week I eat other things.  As a type 2 diabetic with diverticulitis and IBS, and severe exema,   finding a healthy balance can be really difficult, and a bit of a mine field, if not down right depressing from time to time.

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Jelly Roll


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Jelly roll . . . this is a favourite cake of my childhood.  We knew we were in for a real treat if we came home from school and a jelly roll was sitting on the counter waiting to be sliced.  Also known as a Swiss Roll, I think this is a perennial favourite with a lot of people!

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Leona's Crumb Cake


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 I think I have mentioned my good friend Leona before on here.  It was back on the 22nd of November, in 1981 that I met Leona at a Bingo game on the base my then husband had just been posted to. (London, Ontario in Canada)  I was heavily pregnant with my middle son at the time, and Leona was one of the first people I met along with a great gal named Debbie, who just happened to live down the street from me.  I will never forget that night because Debbie said if I went into labor she would watch my other three children until my sister arrived to take over.  Little did any of us know but the very next night I went into labor and the rest is history.

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Shopping and Cooking made easy with Filofax!


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I was recently send a lovely piece of kit from the people at Filofax.   One of their lovely  Saffiano Wrap Tablet Cases in Pear, along with a filofax easel for use with the Tablet Case.   I have to tell you this is going to completely revolutionize my shopping and cooking!


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Juicy Turkey Burgers


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We had the Sister Missionaries over for supper one night last week.  I cooked turkey burgers for them and they were just thrilled.   These are the simplest and juiciest turkey burgers ever!  Why are they so juicy?  Because of the secret ingredient . . .  and to find out what it is read on . . .

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Spring Veggie Bowls


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Bowl eating has definitely become somewhat of a trend in the recent couple of years.  You can call them power bowls or  health bowls, Buddah bowls, etc. but there is something quite inspiring about eating out of a bowl.  Bowls are not just for soup or cereal anymore!  It's like bowls have now become the hot new plates!

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Sausage Hash


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If you are looking for a delicious and quick weeknight supper that is a bit of a doddle to make and something your entire family will love, look no further.  You've hit the jackpot with this one!  This tasty entree ticks all the boxes!

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Pork Chops and Stuffing, Degustabox


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My husband is a real "chop" man.  He loves, loves his meat and potatoes and pork chops are one of his favourite meats.   When I saw the contents of March's Degustabox I knew right away what I wanted to do with the Stuffing Mix from Kent' Kitchen that was in the box, and that was to cook the Toddster some Pork Chops and Stuffing, and that is just what I did. More about them a bit later, first I'd like to tell you about the other products I received in this box.  *nom *nom!

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Encona Taste Explorers Marinades for Grill Season!


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I recently received several jars of delicious Marinades to try out from the people at Encona Taste Explorers, and just in time for Grill Season!

Barbecues are the best part of summer but how often do you taste Jamaica, Korea or Morocco on the grill?

With Encona’s new marinade range, you can spice up your barbeque and bring flavour to the fire. You have a choice immersing your food in Jamaican Jerk, Korean BBQ or Moroccan Harissa.

Each marinade has been inspired by its origin, combining authentic ingredients to create three mouth-watering marinades that will make you feel like you are sunning in the Caribbean, riding a camel in North Africa or wandering through Gwangjang market.

A spicy and fragrant Moroccan paste made with a blend of chilli puree, herbs and spices; the harissa marinade adds the perfect kick to a lamb skewer.

For those who feel taste travelling to Morocco isn’t far enough, you can take your taste buds all the way to Korea. The BBQ marinade is made with a blend of gochujang spices, which can be enjoyed on beef, chicken, pork or grilled vegetables.

Alternatively, you could virtually hop across the pond to the sandy beaches of Jamaica, and enjoy a beach BBQ with a mild jerk marinade blended with scallions, hot pepper and pimento spices.

Each marinade is suitable for vegetarians and two are gluten free.

 I received the Moriccan Harissa Marinade and the Jamaican Jerk Marinade.

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Encona Jamaican Jerk Marinade is an authentic mild jerk seasoning, blended with tomatoes and spices for a distinctive jerk flavour without the heat! Perfect for the whole family to enjoy.  It is available in a 180G jar and is gluten free, lactose free and suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

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Encona Moroccan Harissa Marinade is a spicy and fragrant Moroccan inspired paste made with a blend of chilli puree, herbs and spices, to create a perfect aromatic North African style marinade.   This is available in 180g jars and is also gluten free, lactose free and suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

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The Jerk marinade makes for some really tasty chicken wings.  Simply prepare your wings by clipping off the tips and jointing them and then placing in a bowl with the mariande for several hours before grilling or roasting.  Finger licking good!  It is not as hot as I was afraid it would be.



The Harissa marinade is quite spicy, but great on lamb steaks and skewers, and I absolutely loved it tossed with some sliced  potatoes which I then panfried until golden brown and delicious!



 
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Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu


Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu

We are terribly fond of chicken here in The English Kitchen. I think it is the one protein that we eat the most of and we probably have it at least twice a week.  

We may have a red meat once a week, or probably even less than that . . . and we always have fish at least once as well . . . but chicken, well, it's a real mainstay in our kitchen.


Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu

More often than not, I will serve Chicken Breasts.  Chicken was not something we had very often when I was growing up.  

Occasionally my mother would do a Roast Chicken as a treat . . . and every once in a Blue Moon she would cook Maryland Fried Chicken, which we loved.  It was Chicken Breasts, dipped in egg and cracker crumbs and then fried.  

When that was on the menu, we knew were in for a real treat!  Chicken used to be a lot more expensive in the olden days.

Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu

Nowadays it's fairly affordable, depending on which type you buy.  If you are not bothered as to it's source or the ethics of responsible rearing, well then you could probably eat chicken every night of the week, coz that kind of chicken is cheap as chips.  

I am a bit more bothered about these things.  My husband worked on a Battery Chicken Egg Farm in Germany when he as younger for a short time and it was more than he could stomach . . . 

I have a real heart for animal cruelty and so I don't have a stomach for eating any kind of meat that's not raised according to high standards of animal welfare . . . so we eat chicken about two or three times a week, and it's always free range.

Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu

I know if I had a large family to feed it might be different, but for now it's just us two here,  and I can afford to pay a bit more.  I know not everyone has that option. 

I love chicken breasts because they are like a blank canvas just waiting to be written upon.   

They take to so many different flavours and styles of cooking . . . and as long as you don't overcook them, they make a pretty good basis for a delicious supper.

Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu

Today I cooked them a la Cordon Bleu.  I know . . . which interestingly enough is not to be confused with the French Cooking School of the same name.  

Cordon Bleu actually originated in Switzerland . . . and was done using veal cutlets, stuffed with cheese and ham.  

Chicken Cordon Bleu is, I believe . . . an American invention.    Cordon Bleu merely means Blue Ribbon . . . and this is my blue ribbon chicken!

Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu

I broke all the rules of course.  But I think I have made it better.  I rolled the ham around the cheese, a good Swiss Emmenthal in this case, and then I cut a pocket into the chicken breast and stuffed it inside.  
No risk of the cheese oozing out because it's inside the ham.  I also happen to believe that if you can cut through the fibres of a chicken breast like that . . . you are going to have one very tender chicken breast.  

I could be wrong, don't quote me on that . . . I only know for sure that it seems to work.

Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu

That was the only rule I broke though.  I then floured, egged and crumbed it as per normal, or panĂ© (pan-aaaa) as it was called in Culinary School.  

I added butter to the crumbs ahead of time so that I wouldn't have to fry them, and then I baked them for a few minutes at a high temperature, and then finished them off at a lower temperature.

Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu

The end result . . . perfectly cooked Chicken Cordon Bleu . . . crisply crumbed on the outside, moist and tender on the insides and chock full of oozing cheese and ham.

Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu

In short.  Fabulous.  But don't take my word for it.  

Try them out yourself and see if I'm not telling the truth.  ☺

Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu

  *Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu*
Serves 4 to 6
Printable Recipe

A traditionally complicated dish, simplified.  Delicious and quite easy really!

25 buttery round crackers
4 slices of sourdough bread
6 TBS butter, melted
8 thin slices of deli ham
8 ounces of emmenthaler cheese, grated (about 2 cups, Swiss)
4 large boneless, skinless chicken breasts (I like to use free range chicken)
fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 large free range eggs
2 TBS Dijon mustard
100g of plain flour (about 1 cup)

Preheat the oven 225*C/425*F/ gas mark 7.  Have ready a large baking tray with a lip.  Stir together about 1 tsp of salt and 1/2 tsp of black pepper in a small bowl.

Put the crackers into a food processor and blitz until they are coarsely ground.  Dump into a bowl.  Do the same with the bread, dumping it into the same bowl.  Pour the melted butter over all and toss together.  Spread the crumb mixture out over the baking tray.  Bake them in the hot oven, stirring them from time to time, until golden brown.  This can take anywhere between 3 to 5 minutes.  Remove from the oven and place in a shallow bowl.  Set the tray aside.

Wash your chicken breasts, pat dry and then cut a deep pocket in the thickest part of the breast, with a sharp knife, making an opening of about 3 inches, sliding the knife carefully inside to create the cavity without cutting through the meat to the back or the bottom.  Lay your slices of ham out on a board.  Top each slice with 1/8th of the grated cheese (about 1/4 cup), then roll the ham tightly around it to cover the cheese completely.  Stuff two of these ham rolls in each cavity of the chicken.

Beat the eggs, together with the mustard,  in a shallow bowl.  Place the flour in another shallow bowl.  You should have three shallow bowls laid out.  Place them in this order:  Flour, Eggs and then finally bread crumbs.  Season each chicken breast all over with some of the salt and pepper mix.  Roll each in the flour, then dip into the egg to coat, finally rolling each in the toasted crumbs, pressing the crumbs on to help them adhere.  Place them onto a clean baking sheet, when done, leaving a bit of space between each.  (At this point you could refrigerate them until you are ready to bake them  if you wished.)

Place them into the heated oven and bake for 10 minutes at the higher temperature.  Reduce the oven heat to 200*C/400*F/ gas mark 6, and bake for a further 20 to 25 minutes, or until golden brown and the chicken juices run clear when it is pierced with a fork.  Transfer to a platter and tent with foil.  Allow to rest for five minutes before serving. 

Simple Chicken Cordon Bleu 

This content (written and photography) is the sole property of The English Kitchen. Any reposting or misuse is not permitted. If you are reading this elsewhere, please know that it is stolen content and you may report it to me at mariealicejoan at aol dot com. 

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Easy Lemon Refrigerator Dessert


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We had the Sisters for a tea appointment the other night.   It was the day after transfers and there was a new Sister in town.  It was nice meeting her for the first time and spending some time together with both the girls.  It is always a bit sad to say goodbye to the Missionaries when they leave, but it is also nice to meet the new ones.  Such nice young people they are and I like to treat them extra special, and I especially love to feed them as you know!

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Maple Glazd Black Pepper Scones


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It's a good thing this recipe only makes two scones because if it made any more than that I would be in deep, deep trouble!  These are fabulous!  I found the recipe over on a page called Dessert for Two and it looked like it would be somethine we might enjoy and so I went for it!

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Beef & Macaroni Casserole


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I finally got rid of all the roast beef today by making this delicious casserole.   It's very similar to a Pastitsio, which is a Greek Casserole using ground beef.    My version has a delicious meat filling between two layers of pasta, with a cheese bechamel topping.

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Skinny Broccoli Cheese Soup


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I love broccoli.  It happens to be one of my favourite vegetables.  It wasn't something we ever had when I was a child.  I think I was fully grown and married before I ever saw it, but it was love at first bite for me.  I pretty much love it in every way shape or form, except over cooked.  (I don't think anyone likes it that way and I can't say that I blame them!)  Unfortunately at this stage in life, Broccoli doesn't always love me.  It tends to play havoc with my diverticulitis and so I am very careful nowadays about how I eat it and when I eat it.  Raw or sometimes even cripsy broccoli is not on my menu any longer.

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Mom's Beef Pot Pie


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I cooked a roast at the weekend and had plenty of leftovers afterwards, which doesn't make me sad in the least.  I love leftovers almost more than I love the original meals!!  In my opinion, leftovers taste twice as nice!  I don't understand people who throw away their leftovers.  They are missing out on real treasures!  Yesterday I turned some of them into a tasty Pot Pie!  NOBODY complained!

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Small Batch Coffee Cake Muffins


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When there are only two of you in the family, making whole batches of things can mean a lot of waste unless it is something that can be easily frozen.   Recipes which make only a few of anything are really best.  Also as I am a person who has amost no willpower, its not a great thing to have large amounts of any kind of goodie in the house.  I am very weak when it comes to tasty things.

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Genius Yorkshire Pudding


Yorkshire Puddings

I hardly ever cook a roast dinner on Sundays.  By the time we get back from church and I call my mom, I am too tired. 

I had taken a roast out yesterday and I stuck it into the slow cooker while we were at church and the next thing you know potatoes were roasting, swede was boiling, I had the peas and carrots on and a delicious gravy was made. 

 I know I have shown you my yorkshire puds before, but the pictures were really pants and so I wanted to redo them.   These photos are so much better than the original ones!

Yorkshire Puddings

This is my late Father In Law's recipe. It is an excellent recipe which turns out light and crisp yorkshire puddings every time.

No matter if you cook them individually or in one big tin! Perfect!

Yorkshire Puddings

He was a cook in the Canadian Military and a darn good one at that.   He knew how to make killer Yorkshire puddings.  

It's all in the technique.  If you follow these recommendations, your puddings will always be great too!

 Yorkshire Puddings

Make sure all of your ingredients are at room temperature before you begin.  Not sure why this works but it does.  

Make your batter and then let it sit for one hour (at the very least).  This helps the gluten to develop and makes for a very light and tall pudding.

Yorkshire Puddings

The oil/dripping/fat in your baking tin has to be VERY hot.  So hot that the puddings begin to cook as soon as you pour the batter into the pan.  

For this reason you will want to mix the batter together in a beaker that  you can easily pour from, and yes, heat that oil in the pan in the oven almost until it begins to smoke.

Yorkshire Puddings

Really hot oil  makes sure that your batters don't stick to the pan and ensures a really crisp finish.  

Nobody wants a soggy Yorkshire pud!

Yorkshire Puddings

Just look at that crisp tall finish!  It's the best!  I start them in a very hot oven and then I slowly decrease the temperature for 10 degrees ever 5 minutes of the cooking time.  

This helps to keep them crisp, yes   . . .  but also makes sure that they don't get burnt.  

The initial high heat sears them and then the lowering of temperature at intervals helps keep em crisp and keeps em cooking without them burning.

 Yorkshire Puddings

A tall, light and crisp Yorkshire pudding is a thing of beauty.  They're not hard to make or complicated . . .  they just take time and these few extra little steps.  

Trust me when I say they are worth all of it. Totally and absolutely worth it.

Yorkshire Puddings

 *Yorkshire Puddings*
Makes 12
Printable Recipe

I wonder who it was that discovered that with just a little flour, milk  and eggs you could create something that is so crispy, light and delicious!  Sunday lunch just wouldn't be Sunday lunch without a couple of these on the plate.  These turn out perfect every time, as long as you follow the directions to a "T."  Not hard to do really as they are very simple.

2 large free range eggs, at room temperature
1 tsp salt
1 1/3 cups milk, at room temperature (308ml)
1 cup flour (140g)
a little oil or dripping

Make sure all your ingredients are at room temperature before beginning.  Beat your eggs together in a large measuring jug until very light.  Whisk in the milk.  Sift the flour into a bowl along with the salt.  Make a well in the middle and add the wet ingredients all at once, pouring them into the well, and then whisk them in, slowly incorporating the dry mixture from the sides until you have a smooth batter.  Now, this is the important bit . . . COVER IT AND LET IT SIT ON THE SIDEBOARD FOR ONE HOUR.

Preheat your oven to 230*C/450*F.  Place a small amount of oil or dripping into each cup of a 12 cup muffin tin.  Place the tin into the hot oven to heat up until the fat is hot and sizzling.  remove from the oven and quickly divide the batter amongst each muffin cup, filling them about 2/3 full.  Return to the oven and bake for 20 minutes, until well risen, browned and crispy, reducing the oven temperature by 10 degrees every five minutes.  Serve hot with plenty of gravy!!

Yorkshire Puddings

Now that's  a tunnel of love, perfect for cradling some delicious gravy.  Mmm mmm mmm . . . now that's what I call genius!

Bon Appetit!

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