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Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms


Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

 Red meat is not something we eat very often in our house.  Most of the time we will eat chicken or fish and often we won't have meat at all.  When we do have red meat however, it is usually in the form of chops or steak.

I do love a good beef steak.  It is my love of a good steak which keeps me from going off meat entirely.  I just crave one every now and then. And when I do get a steak I am very picky about where it comes from.

 
My preferred cut is a rib eye. Well marbeled with soft fat that melts and no gristle.  About 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch thick.  Of course I also love a tenderloin steak, but those are not very often in the budget! 

My mother loved t-bone steaks. She and my father would buy a hind of beef every year for the freezer.  She would carefully jot down which cuts she wanted, how many roasts, steaks etc. We never got our meat from a shop, wrapped in plastic. It came from the freezer, wrapped in brown paper.


Unfortunately my mother did not really know how to cook a steak.  She didn't like getting her cooktop all dirty and so she pretty much stewed any steak she cooked by cooking it on a low temperature so that it wouldn't spatter. 

They were never brown. No properly brown, with sticky gilded edges that are all caramelised and delicious. I never truly learned to appreciate steak until I became an adult and learned how to properly cook one.

Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

 I am not afraid of a dirty cook top.  You cannot be a decent cook and be afraid at getting the top of your stove dirty. I know, it can often be a pain to clean up, especially if we are tired and it is at the end of the day.

It is always worth the extra effort however. It really only takes a few minutes and food which is properly browned and cooked tastes ever so much better!

Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

 These steaks I cooked today were Strip Loin Medallions. I couldn't get any rib eyes and had to settle for what they had.  They came two medallions to the pack. 

Here is a good tip. If you are buying supermarket steaks they will have been injected with water and food colouring to make them look nice and pink.  Take them out of the plastic wrap, pat them dry and leave them uncovered in the refrigerator to dry out overnight.

Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

This is the best way to get the nicest colour when it comes to browning your steaks. And a nice colour means a nice flavour. When cooking a steak on the stove top you always want to start it off on a high heat.

This will give you a really good sear on you meat. Also don't flip it more than once. Agitating your meat by flipping it over and over again causes it to release too many juices.

Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

Its the same with mushrooms. There is no need to wash your mushrooms in water.  They will become waterlogged if you do. Simply wipe them clean with a damp cloth. I cut them into thick slices.

Add your fat to the pan over medium high heat, and as soon as it begins to foam, add the mushrooms. Leave them to cook for a good 3 to 5 minutes without stirring. That way you will get nice caramelised edges on at least one side.

Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms


The only mushrooms we had in our house when I was growing up came in a can. I don't remember ever seeing fresh mushrooms in a shop.  And they all came from China. I shudder now at the thought. Who knows what we were eating.

They were always a grey brown colour and quite rubbery, but we ate them because we thought they were exotic.  I guess they would have been considered exotic. I doubt my grandmother ever cooked a mushroom in her lifetime!

Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

 We used to throw these rubber mushrooms on top of pizzas and all sorts.  We would fry them up with onions and smack our lips. What we were tasting was butter and maybe garlic (another rare ingredient.) 

I don't think I had an actual fresh mushroom until I was well into adulthood. What a taste revelation! I love them raw in salads and of course fried.  I especially love fried mushrooms with steaks!

Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

Especially if they have been properly cooked. Golden brown at the edges and tender, and if you add some herbs and garlic to them, so much the better.

That's where most of the flavour in this dish comes from today.  From the mushrooms, which are fried til golden brown.  The addition of fresh garlic and herbs lifts them from tasty to sublimely delicious.

Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

 There is no rubber her. Just lush perfectly cooked mushrooms, well flavoured and delicious, spooned over perfectly cooked steaks.

The steaks are simply seasoned with salt and pepper. You need nothing more. If you have a good steak and it is properly cooked the flavour speaks for itself.

Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

The mushrooms are the perfect accent. Herby and woodsy and rich with butter and garlic. But that's not all that lifts these steaks to perfection, no . . . that's not all.

A final pat of butter is situated on top of each cooked steak so that it melts down into the flesh adding an extra special touch of flavour.

 

Its not alot really. Just a touch, but it is enough and it is gorgeous. I like my steaks medium rare, if you prefer yours more well done you may want to cook them for a bit longer. 

Back in the day we used to go to the Ponderosa restaurant for a steak dinner.  With baked potatoes, and mushrooms, fried onions and salad. We were in heaven.

This beats that by a mile.  Just sayin . . . .

 

Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms
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Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

Yield: 4
Author: Marie Rayner
prep time: 5 Mincook time: 20 Mintotal time: 25 Min
Tender and juicy steaks cooked to perfection and served with herbed butter mushrooms. Delicious!

Ingredients

  • 1 TBS light olive oil
  • 1 TBS butter
  • 1/2 pound mushrooms, thickly sliced (8 ounces. I used a mix of white closed cap and chestnut)
  • 3 cloves of garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 tsp chopped fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 tsp chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 tsp fresh chopped oregano
  • 2 lean Strip Loin steaks, or 4 medallions
  • salt and black pepper to taste
To finish:
  • 2 TBS butter
  • a bit of chopped thyme, rosemry and oregano

Instructions

  1. Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the oil and the butter. As soon as the butter begins to foam, add the mushrooms. Leave without agitating or moving until they start to turn golden brown. Add the herbs and garlic, give it all a good stir and cook for a further 3 minutes. Remove to a bowl.
  2. Season the steaks all over with salt and pepper.  Turn the skillet heat to high. Add the steaks and cook for 3 minutes  per side. They should be nice and brown. Turn the heat down to medium and cook for a further 5 to 8 minutes for medium rare.
  3. Return the mushrooms to the skillet.  Divide the butter between the steaks, placing a small pat in the centre of each, and allowing it to melt.  Sprinkle with the additional herbs and serve.
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Herbed Garlic Butter Steak & Mushrooms

Red meat is not something I generally eat a lot of. I have low iron levels however and so I thought I might try to eat some red meat once a week instead of the once a month. I know liver is supposed to be good for you, but I cannot abide it.  Just the smell of it cooking makes me gag. Me <----spoilt brat. 

This content (written and photography) is the sole property of The English Kitchen. Any reposting or misuse is not permitted. If you are reading this elsewhere, please know that it is stolen content and you may report it to me at: mariealicejoan at aol dot com Thanks so much for visiting. Do come again! 

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Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme


 


I had some chicken breasts in the freezer that needed using up and so I took them out the other day to thaw and cook.  They were really nice ones.  Free range. Organic.  Skin on, boneless.

I had gotten them so that I could stuff them sometime with a tasty filling between the skin and the flesh. Best laid plans and all that! They were not cheap however, so I really wanted to cook them in a way that would do them justice!

Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme

 I confess that I use Chicken breasts more than any other kind of chicken. They are an incredibly versatile protein. You can adapt them to so many flavours and uses.

Sometimes I will cook them on their own with some simple seasonings or other flavours added. Other times I will poach them so that I can use the meat for sandwiches or in casseroles. I usually keep packages of them in the freezer ready to go for whatever purpose.

Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme

 This simple method of cooking them that I am sharing with you today would also work well with chicken thighs.  I actually love eating chicken thighs most of all, but generally speaking  I will eat the breast because it is lower in fat. 

Thighs have an almost gamey flavour that works very well with stronger flavours.  These Tomato and Herb Baked Thighs are one of my favourite ways to cook them. This was a real favourite of Mr B's business partner when I lived down South and worked at the Manor.  I also had the opportunity to cook it for Princess Sophie's father on one occasion.

Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme

 Although I have used chicken breasts here today, with the skin on, you could also use boneless, skinless chicken breasts. They will not take quite so long to cook as this version, so be careful to not let them dry out.

The skin in this recipe helps to keep the meat moist and does impart flavour. Plus it gets nice and crisp. I admit I do love crisp chicken skin, even if its not that healthy to eat.


You begin by seasoning the chicken all over well with salt and pepper. I like to pat them dry first with some paper towels. That way your skin will get really crisp. 

Then you simply brown them in a bit of oil. You will need a skillet that will easily go from the stove top to the oven. I used my cast iron skillet.


Once you have achieved a nice golden and crisp skin, you flip them over.  At that point I add a knob of butter to the skillet and some of my fresh garden thyme. What a lovely smell.

I baste them a few times with the thyme flavoured melted butter and pan juices. And then I pop the whole skillet into the oven and let the oven finish them off.

Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme

 They don't take too long in the oven. Only about 15 minutes maximum in total. You just want to roast them until they are cooked through and the juices run clear with no pinkness remaining. 

If you are checking them with a thermometer the meat should register 165*F/75*C when inserted in the thickest part of the chicken. I like to baste the breasts a few times while they are cooking with some of the pan juices.

Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme

 That is basically it. The chicken is done. All it needs to do after that is rest for about five minutes. I have given instuctions for two breasts, but you can easily multiply this to cook as many as you want.

This chicken always ends up tender and very juicy.  It is filled with incredible flavours also. There is something about thyme which goes very well with chicken. I dare say you could add a few cloves of peeled and bashed garlic to the butter in the pan as well before you put it into the oven for even more flavour.


Garlic goes really well with chicken.  And thyme as well for that matter.  I use garlic and thyme more often than when not when I am roasting a chicken whole. 

Lemon also.  Next time you are roasting a chicken try stuffing the cavity with a bulb of garlic cut in half, a lemon cut in half and a bunch of thyme. Delicious!

Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme

 Once your chicken is cooked through, you will want to rest it before serving it.  This allows the juices of the chicken to be reabsorbed along with the other flavours.  

Too many people don't allow their meat to rest after cooking it. This is a huge mistake and can make the difference between something which is moist and flavour filled, or something which is dry.

Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme

 I have to laugh when I think about how I cooked when I was just a young bride. My knowledge was so lacking, even though I thought I knew a lot.

I really knew nothing. I remember one time getting a good deal at the Safeway store in Calgary for whole chickens and thinking what a bargain they were.  I had no idea they were stewing hens. I had no idea there was such a thing!  DUH! 

Time and experience taught me different. We had to eat more than a few rubber chickens in my quest towards more knowlege!


In any case these chicken breasts are truly lovely. Succulent and moist and filled wih lovely flavour. They were enjoyed  along with some gratineed potatoes and creamed spinach. 
 
You could also serve them with rice or baked potatoes, mash, boiled potatoes, etc.  Any vegetable would work on the side. Remember the chicken is the star here.  Anything else is only an accent!

Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme

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Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme
Yield: 2
Author: Marie Rayner
prep time: 5 Mincook time: 21 Mininactive time: 5 Mintotal time: 31 Min
I have used boneless, skin-on chicken breasts for this, but thighs would also work well. You can also use bone in or boneless skinless chicken, but the cook times would need adjusting. These are simple to make, moist and delicious with a crisp skin and beautiful flavour.

Ingredients

  • 2 boneless, skinless chicken breast fillets (6 to 8 ounces each)
  • fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 TBS unflavoured cooking oil
  • 2 TBS butter
  • a handful of sprigs of fresh thyme
  • half of a fresh lemon

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200*C/400*F/gas mark 6.
  2. Pat the chicken dry with some kitchen towels and then season generously all over with salt and black pepper.
  3. Heat the oil in an oven-proof skillet over medium high heat. Add the chicken skin side down and cook for about six minutes or so without agitating it. The skin should be golden brown and crisp. Carefully turn them over.  Add the butter and sprigs of thyme.
  4. The butter should melt and when it does, spoon some of it over the chicken.  Place the chicken in the pan into the preheated oven.
  5. Roast, basting once or twice with the pan juices, for about 10 to 15 minutes longer, or until the chicken tests done and the juices run clear.
  6. Remove the chicken from the pan to a board and leave to rest for about five  minutes.
  7. Serve with some of the pan juices spooned over top and a squeeze of lemon.  Delicious!
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Pan Roasted Chicken Breasts with Thyme

I know I eat a lot of chicken, but it is a healthy source of protein and is incredibly versatile! Its also probably much more affordable than other kinds of protein. At least here in the UK at any rate!  Its a good thing I enjoy it!

This content (written and photography) is the sole property of The English Kitchen. Any reposting or misuse is not permitted. If you are reading this elsewhere, please know that it is stolen content and you may report it to me at: mariealicejoan at aol dot com Thanks so much for visiting. Do come again! 

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Mary Berry's Cheese Scones


Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

I wanted to make some scones to enjoy the other day.  I have made quite a few scones here on the blog and I love them all. I do like to try new things however from time to time.
 
On this particular day I turned to the doyenne of British baking and cookery, Mary Berry.  She has a lot of scone recipes. I chose to make her Cheese Scones.  

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones


  Before I talk about them however I wanted to tell you about something else. Perhaps you may have noticed the new background beneath my photos here on the blog today.

It is courtesy of the Paper Bag Co.  They were so impressed with my IG photos and the photos here on the blog they wanted to send me one of their Instagram Photo Bags. I don't know what was so impressive about my photos, but I am always open to discovering new ways of improving them.

Paper Bag Co Foodie Bag 

   This is what they call their Instagram Bag, the Foodie Bag.  It has been created through a collaberation between phone photographer Matt Inwood and Stylist Sophie Purser. 

It is designed especially for those who enjoyand have a passion for taking photographs of food specifically for posting them online, ideally on Instagram.

The Instagram Bag 


It is acually quite a large bag.  The perfect size for holding your photograph taking equipment, making it easier to take along with you. 


The Instagram Bag

Included in the bag is a 15-inch photographic reflector and diffuser.  This is the tool which all professional photographers have at the top of their kit bag. 

It is designed to help you to brighten and enhance both highlights and shadows, and either subtly or dramatically alter the lighting and colour in all of the images you create.

The Instagram Bag

 Included are a set of four beautifully crafted papers from Black Velvet Styling, the photographic backdrop company set up by stylist Sophie a couple of years ago.  These have been designed to provide affordable backdrops for amateurs and professionals to create mouthwatering images of their food and still life creations. 

They are perfect for transforming a plate of food into a gorgeous image fit for sharing on Instagram and we’ve given you a variety of starter colours and textures to experiment with. I have used one of them here today as a backdrop for my scones.

The Instagram Bag
Also included is an exclusive set of ten beautiful postcards for Cotton Bag Company, with tips on the reverse of each explaining how to use light, think about composition, choose your background and much, much more. 

These have been put together by renowned phone photographer Matt Inwood to share some of his knowledge on how to get the most from shooting with your phone camera. Matt has been running critically acclaimed phone photography workshops for more than three years. 

I have to say it is quite an impressive bag of tools and I am really looking forward to really exploring everything about it when I am settled and back to work in Canada.  If you are interested in discovering more about it you can find out more about it here.

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

Now back to Mary Berry's Cheese Scones.  These are THE perfect cheese scone.  I have made cheese scones before in the past and they were good, but these are excellent.

Then again, what would you expect from Mary Berry!  She is an expert in all things baked and otherwise when it comes to cooking.  I trust her judgement explicitly!


I have to say that the background paper I chose for these photos fit with the subject matter beautifully. It also went very well with my dishes, setting everything off beautifully.

I so love my dishes and I really hope that I will be able to transport them to Canada. They are me in every way.  I do so love the colour white, and I also love hearts and words on things.

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

 I will tell you upfront that I ended up using a bit too much milk in my scones. I misinterpreted how much 1/4 pint actually was in ounces. In otherwords, I got mixed up. 

My dough was a bit wetter than it should have been. But I persevered and all credit to Mary, despite my dough being somewhat on the wet side, they still turned out beautifully.

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

 I have made sure that won't happen to you. My measurements in the recipe are exactly what they should be.  No worries on that score. 

These scones have a mix of beautiful flavours. Dry mustard powder and cayenne powder are both included in the mix.

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

 These are both ingredients that go very well with cheese. I always use them in the sauce for my favourite macaroni and cheese recipe. 

It does use self raising flour. I understand that self raising flour is no something some of you can get ahold of easily, but don't worry. I have included instructions in the note on how you can make your own.

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

 Included as well is plenty of grated strong/sharp cheddar cheese. Do use the best cheese that your money can buy.

The better the cheese, the tastier the scone. I used a vintage cheddar from  Wyke Farms. One thing I will miss from over here is the cheese.

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

British cheeses are beautiful and there is such a lovely variety of them. I became a true cheese lover only since  moving here to the UK.  

Prior to this I only ate processed cheese for the most part. Nobody had ever truly been able to tempt me into trying anything stronger.

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones
I fell in love with the cheese here in the UK almost instantly. I used to buy bags of cheese crumbs from the cheese monger in the Chester Marker.  They were a mix of every kind of cheese he had been using on any particular day.

I was never disappointed.  They were always wonderful in sauces and sandwiches, on pizzas etc.  

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

 Then of course when I worked at the manor I used to cook for a lot of dinner parties. Silver service, multiple courses.

The dinner parties always ended with a cheese course. I need to be able to put together a delicious cheese tray for my employers and their guests. The only way I could do that is if I learn about, to taste and to enjoy the cheese.

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

I used to put together an assortmnt of five or six cheeses.  One traditional such as a good cheddar.  One blue of some kind or a stilton. One cheese would be soft for spreading such as an ash covered goats cheese 

I would also include a French cheese and possibly a German or a Swiss. There would also be fruit. Grapes and pears were a favourite along with apple wedges. Sometimes if I could get it, membrillo or quince paste.


I became somewhat of an expert at putting together the cheese course.  And I couldn't have done it without being brave enough to taste and try the different cheeses

These scones are beautiful served warm and split with some cold butter and some chilli jam. Its that sweet/hot/savoury combination that most people love. They are best on the day, but you can have it on good authority that they are also very good eaten cold the day after, whilst hunched over a computer keyboard.

Mary Berry's Cheese Scones
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Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

Yield: 8 regular scones
Author: Marie Rayner
prep time: 10 Mincook time: 15 Mintotal time: 25 Min
Delicious cold or warm. These are fabulous cut in half and spread wih lashings of butter and a bit of chili jam!

Ingredients

  • 2 cups plus 1 tsp (225g) self raising flour (See note)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp dry mustard powder
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne powder
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 TBS cold butter
  • 1 1/4 cup (150g) grated mature cheddar cheese
  • 1 large free range egg
  • milk to the equivalent of 5 fluid ounces (1/4 pint)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 220*C/425*F/ gas mark 7.  Line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Sift the flour into a bowl along with the salt, mustard powder, cayenne pepper and baking powder. Drop in the butter and rub it into the flour mixture until the mixture resembles bread crumbs. Stir in 2/3 of the cheese.
  3. Break the egg into a measuring jug and add milk to give you the equivalent of 5 fluid ounces (1/4 pint). Stir this into the dry mixture and mix to a soft but not sticky dough.  Turn out onto a floured board and knead lightly for a few turns. Pat out into a 6 inch round.
  4. Stamp out into rounds using a sharp round (2 1/2 inch) cutter and place onto the baking sheet.  Brush the tops with a bit more milk and sprinkle with the remaining cheese.
  5. Bake for 15 minutes in the preheated oven for 15 minutes unil well risen and golden.  Slip onto a wire rack to cool.  Best eaten on the day.

notes:

To Make Self Raising Flour: Just add 2 teaspoons of baking powder for each 150g/6oz/1 cup plain flour. Sift the flour and baking powder together into a bowl before using, to make sure the baking powder is thoroughly distributed (or you can put both ingredients into a bowl and whisk them together).
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Mary Berry's Cheese Scones

You really cannot fault any of Mary Berry's recipes. If you follow them scrupulously, they always turn out and are fail proof!  I have never had a failure with any of them! 

This content (written and photography) is the sole property of The English Kitchen. Any reposting or misuse is not permitted. If you are reading this elsewhere, please know that it is stolen content and you may report it to me at: mariealicejoan at aol dot com Thanks so much for visiting. Do come again! 

 Follow my blog with Bloglovin

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Orange, Date & Oat Muffins



What a miserable rainy horrible day it is out there today.  Dark and heavy clouds made it really difficult to take decent photos of these muffins. I hope that my photos don't put you off from wanting to try them! 
 
They are excellent muffins!  Orange, Date & Oat Muffins. Moist and filled with lovely flavours.  I adapted the recipe from an original recipe which came from a 1991 Robin Hood Baking Booklet.


Years ago they used to put out Baking Booklets full of festive and harvest ideas every year.  They would be stuck in magazines, or newspapers free of charge.

I can remember watching television and the Kraft Foods commercials would come on and they would also offer you recipe booklets. All you had to to was write requesting them.  They would send them to you once a month for nothing.


I used to love those little booklets, especially the ones from Kraft. There were usually quite a few good recipes in them, mixed amongst some awfully gaudy ones.

But hey, free for the asking!  No reason to complain! They were inspiration for sure, if nothing else!

Orange, Date & Oat Muffins

I saved quite a few of them through the years. I still use some of the recipes that I gleaned from them, so all was not lost! 

As I said, this recipe came from a Robin Hood Flour one. Baking Festival Recipes was the title.  There are 27 pretty tasty recipes for cakes, cookies, muffins, etc. in it.

 
These muffins intrigued me because they contain a whole orange. I have made muffins before, and cakes too, which contain a whole orange. Usually you had to boil the orange first.

There is no boiling of this orange. You simply cut it into quarters, remove the seeds and blitz it up in a food processor or blender until it is chopped into small bits.

Orange, Date & Oat Muffins

 You begin by soaking some old fashioned oats in milk. I always use whole milk for my baking unless otherwise specified. 

Old fashioned oats are the large flake oats. Don't be tempted to use instant oats. They will no have the right consistency. You want an oat with some bite to it.  Instan oats would become far too gummy.

Orange, Date & Oat Muffins

 Using the whole oats gives you a muffin with plenty of lovely wholesome texture. Oats are very good for you and are filled with fibre and iron and are good for your heart.

The chopped orange gets stirred into the soaked oats, along with an egg, some brown sugar and melted butter.  There is also plenty of chopped dates in the mix.  I adore dates.

Orange, Date & Oat Muffins

 They have a lovely sticky toffee flavour.  Dates are actually what makes sticky toffee cake so moist and delicious. I love to use dates in my baking and always have a bag or two in the store cupboard.

They are wonderful in cakes and bakes.  I love to make date slices, and of course they work beautifully in muffins such as these ones I am sharing today.  Little sticky hints of caramel to go along with the tart orange flavours.

Orange, Date & Oat Muffins

When I was living down South I sometimes went into London to the Borough Market. I don't know what you couldn't get at the Borough Market.

It was filled with stalls selling everything from soup to nuts! I remember one time buying these lush chocolate covered dates.  I still think about them.  Taste memories are some of the best kinds of memories.


I don't think those chocolate covered dates ever made it back to our house. They were gone before we even hit the train.  They were probably one of the nicest things I have ever eaten.
 
Ten years later I am still thinking about them. And I probably always will.

When I was pregnant for my oldest daughter I can remember having a craving for "Puffa Puffa Rice." It was a breakfast cereal made from puffed rice coated in a brown sugar and pineapple coating. 

Orange, Date & Oat Muffins

I had loved it as a child and they had stopped making it. I was 21 when I was pregnant for Eileen and I am 65 now.  That is a long time to have a craving for something! 

Taste memories. They only get better with time. Either that or we crave them more. One way or the other most of them will never be fulfilled.  Now back to the muffins.

Orange, Date & Oat Muffins

 These delicious moist muffins will always be there for us. That's the good thing about recipes like this. They never disappear or go away so long as you curate them and keep them in a safe place.

And that's what I am doing today.  Sticking the recipe here online for everyone to enjoy! Tina and Tony were here earlier and they said they were excellent!

Orange, Date & Oat Muffins

Tangy from the orange, which also adds to the moistness.  Studded with sticky toffee dates, and willed with wholesome oats.

I cannot think of a way in which these could ever be improved!  I really can't.  Unless you also wanted to add some toasted chopped nuts.


Walnuts would be very nice. Just toast them in a hot oven for about 10 minutes, let them cool and chop. You decide how many you would like.

I think another nice touch would be to brush the tops of the warm muffins with some warm orange marmalade. That would make them glow and add even more orange flavour!  Yummy yummy!!

 

Orange, Date & Oat Muffins

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Orange, Date & Oat Muffins
Yield: Makes 12
Author: Marie Rayner
prep time: 10 Mincook time: 25 Mintotal time: 35 Min
These lush muffins contain a whole orange, which makes for a tangy muffin that is quick and easy to bake and studded with sticky bits of date!

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups (300ml) whole milk
  • 1 cup (80g) old fashioned oats
  • 1 medium orange, washed, seeded and quartered
  • 1 large free range egg
  • 3/4 cup firmly packed (150g) soft light brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup (120g) butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup (75) chopped pitted dates
  • 2 cups (280g) plain/all purpose flour
  • 1 TBS baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp fine sea salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200*C/400*F/ gas mark  6.  Line a 12 cup medium muffin tin with paper liners.
  2. Measure the oats into a bowl and pour the milk over top. Let stand 5 minutes.
  3. Put the orange into a food processor or blender and blitz until it is finely chopped.  Add to the oats along with th egg, brown sugar, melted butter and dates.
  4. Measure the flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl. Add the wet ingredients all at once and stir together just to combine.
  5. Divide the batter between the prepared muffin cups and bake in the preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes, or until golden brown. A toothpick inserted in the centre should come out clean and the tops should spring back when lightly touched.
  6. Tip out onto a wire rack to cool completely.  Store leftovers in an airtight container.
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Orange, Date & Oat Muffins

I usually bake something like a muffin at the weekend. You never know when people are going to stop by so its nice to have something in the cake tin. They are also an extra special nice treat to enjoy with a hot cuppa in the middle of the afternoon or the evening when you're watching the telly. 

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Marie Rayner
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