Amish Potato Salad

Sunday 3 July 2022

Amish Potato Salad 




I have long held a fascination for the Amish, or horse and buggy people as they are lovingly referred to.  I have lived near Horse and Buggy country in Southern Ontario, where you often saw them trotting along the road and a beware of horse and buggy sign was very common on the roadways.

I am not sure what it is that fascinates me. The slower, unsophisticated lifestyle?  Perhaps.  The way they eschew all things modern?  Perhaps also  . . . but I am not so naïve as to think I could ever live that way. 

 
Amish Potato Salad 




I like many of my modern conveniences far too much, and I don't think I would like having to wear a dress and cap all of the time.

The food however?  I could easily cope with that. They are incredibly good cooks.   I have been collecting Amish recipes and cookbooks since the 1980's.

I think the horse and buggy people I lived near in Canada actually were old order Mennonites, but they are very similar to be honest.


Amish Potato Salad 




I remember going to a farmer's market in Kitchener/Waterloo back in the early 1980's.  There were lots of Mennonites who had stalls, selling some of the nicest preserves, meats, produce, baked goods and crafts you could ever want to purchase.

There was also a Mennonite restaurant in the Saint Jacob's area we loved to eat at called Anna Mae's.  Best food ever I have eaten! Ever.

I also used to buy fabulous produce, meats, etc. at the 401 flea market in the 1990's Again from Mennonites.

Amish Potato Salad 


With that in mind I wanted to try a different potato salad this weekend, a traditional Amish Potato Salad with eggs.  I found a recipe in a book I have entitled The Amish Cook, Recollections and Recipes from an Old Order Amish Family, by Elizabeth Coblentz.

Every recipe I have made from this book has always been delicious, and this salad was no exception. I was a bit concerned it might be too sweet, but it was just perfect!

Creamy, crunchy, with just the right amount of egg and celery. 


Amish Potato Salad 




WHAT YOU NEED TO MAKE AMISH POTATO SALAD

There are actually two aspects to this recipe. The salad itself, but also the cooked dressing that you prepare ahead of time to make the salad.  

Don't worry if you don't want to or  haven't got the time to make the cooked dressing. You can use Miracle Whip or even mayonnaise in it's place. 



Amish Potato Salad



 

For the Salad Dressing:
  • 1 large free range egg
  • 1 cup (240ml) water plus 1 TBS
  • 2/3 cup (82.5 g) plain, all purpose flour
  • 2 tsp dry mustard powder
  • 2/3 cup (126.5 g) fine granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup (120ml) cider vinegar
  • 3/4 cup (180ml) salad oil (I use light olive oil)
  • 1 TBS lemon juice



Amish Potato Salad 

 


For the salad:
  • 4 hard boiled eggs, cooled
  • 3 cups cooked, diced and chilled potatoes (with or without skins on)
  • 1/4 cup (55g) of salad dressing or Miracle Whip
  • 1 1/2 tsp American style prepared mustard
  • 2 TBS cider vinegar
  • 1/4 small onion, chopped fine
  • 3/4 cup (150g) sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • black pepper to taste
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 2 TBS milk 

I like to make the cooked salad dressing a day ahead of time, if I am using it, so that it is nicely chilled when it comes to putting everything together.   New potatoes are best when it comes to making potato salad as they hold their shape better.

You can add a bit of vinegar to the cooking water when you are boiling them. This will also help them to hold their shape.  I prefer my potatoes peeled in this type of salad.

By the American style mustard called for here, I mean the bright yellow mustard.  You can also use Dijon. I did, and its fine. Not as harsh or vinegary and with a bit of a zip.

You can use finely chopped spring onions instead of regular onion for a milder taste and more color.

I always de-string my celery. Just grab the strings with the side of a knife and gently pull down the length of the stalk. Easy peasy I don't like string on my celery. 



Amish Potato Salad 





HOW TO MAKE AMISH POTATO SALAD


Make the dressing a day ahead. It will keep for many weeks in the refrigerator. In a small bowl, lightly beat the egg with the 1 TBS of water.

Mix the flour, mustard and sugar together in a saucepan, eliminating any lumps. Whisk in the remaining water, oil, lemon juice and vinegar. Heat over medium high heat for one minute, stirring constantly. The mixture will be quite thick.

Add a bit of the hot mixture to the beaten egg to temper it and then return the whole lot to the saucepan. Cook for one minutes longer, until it has the consistency of mashed potatoes and is slightly off white in color.

Remove from the heat, cover with wax paper and cool completely. Store in a covered jar in the refrigerator.





Amish Potato Salad



 

Peel the eggs and mash them in a large bowl using a potato masher. Add the potatoes, salad dressing, mustard, vinegar, onion, sugar, salt, celery and milk. Mix everything together well. The salad will be moist, but it will absorb some of the dressing upon standing.

Store covered and in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.



 




If you are fond of boiled eggs or celery, by all means add more. Some people like to add diced sweet pickles, or pickle relish.  I have never been fond of pickles in my potato salad, but I do like egg.

I will often garnish the top with sliced boiled egg and a sprinkle of sweet paprika, or parsley, or both! 



 



We really love our potato salads in my family.  I often make them in summer when we are eating lighter, outdoor type of food. They keep for several days and go with just about anything.

Some of my favorite potato salad recipes are: 

DILL POTATO SALAD - You make your own creamy mayonnaise for this salad. Homemade mayonnaise is so very easy to make. Especially if you have an immersion blender, and I do.  This is quite simply a delicious salad. If you like dill, this is for you.



BISTRO POTATO SALADDelicious fresh flavors, and no mayonnaise.  Boiled new baby potatoes and egg.  This salad uses lovely baby salad greens, fresh herbs ( I used mint, dill, tarragon, parsley and chives, and a few spring onions.) A few thinly sliced crisp garden radishes complete the picture . . .



Amish Potato Salad

Amish Potato Salad

Yield: 4 - 6
Author: Marie Rayner
Perfect for special occasions. I adapted this recipe from a cookbook, The Amish Cook by Elizabeth Coblentz. Its delicious. You can use either the cooked salad dressing (recipe provided) or you can use Miracle Whip. (The dressing makes 2 1/2 cups, but you will be able to use it for all sorts.)

Ingredients

For the Salad Dressing:
  • 1 large free range egg
  • 1 cup (240ml) water plus 1 TBS
  • 2/3 cup (82.5 g) plain, all purpose flour
  • 2 tsp dry mustard powder
  • 2/3 cup (126.5 g) fine granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup (120ml) cider vinegar
  • 3/4 cup (180ml) salad oil (I use light olive oil)
  • 1 TBS lemon juice
For the salad:
  • 4 hard boiled eggs, cooled
  • 3 cups cooked, diced and chilled potatoes (with or without skins on)
  • 1/4 cup (55g) of salad dressing or Miracle Whip
  • 1 1/2 tsp American style prepared mustard
  • 2 TBS cider vinegar
  • 1/4 small onion, chopped fine
  • 3/4 cup (150g) sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • black pepper to taste
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 2 TBS milk

Instructions

  1. Make the dressing a day ahead. It will keep for many weeks in the refrigerator.
  2. In a small bowl, lightly beat the egg with the 1 TBS of water.
  3. Mix the flour, mustard and sugar together in a saucepan, eliminating any lumps. Whisk in the remaining water, oil, lemon juice and vinegar. Heat over medium high heat for one minute, stirring constantly. The mixture will be quite thick.
  4. Add a bit of the hot mixture to the beaten egg to temper it and then return the whole lot to the saucepan. Cook for one minutes longer, until it has the consistency of mashed potatoes and is slightly off white in color.
  5. Remove from the heat, cover with wax paper and cool completely. Store in a covered jar in the refrigerator.
  6. Peel the eggs and mash them in a large bowl using a potato masher. Add the potatoes, salad dressing, mustard, vinegar, onion, sugar, salt, celery and milk. Mix everything together well. The salad will be moist, but it will absorb some of the dressing upon standing.
  7. Store covered in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.
Did you make this recipe?
Tag @marierayner5530 on instagram and hashtag it # marierayner5530
Amish Potato Salad





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2 comments

  1. I live in "Pennsylvania Dutch Country" (as the tourist industry calls it), and I know just what you mean about the food! There are little "farm stands" everywhere here with great-looking produce and delicious baked goods. Do the Canadian Amish have shoo-fly pie--talk about SWEET!!! I love to see the Amish farmers and their teams working the fields, but I feel sorry sometimes for the buggy horses. I have a Mennonite cookbook, which belonged to my mom, and I bake some of my Christmas cookies from its recipes. My mom's family was Pennsylvania German, but not Amish. The Amish are Mennonite, but there are lots of Mennonites here who aren't "Plain" like the Amish. The women usually wear caps and dresses though. I agree with you about wearing those! I have some Mennonite ancestors, one of them actually disowned a daughter who married a minister of the "wrong" denomination! I think they're more tolerant these days!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am sure that they do Marty! I have never tasted it though. My mother's family were what was called German Dutch here in Nova Scotia. I think there are Mennonites here in Nova Scotia also. You are right some are old order and some are a lot more tolerant, but they all are great cooks! xoxo

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